In the early 1950’s the Master Plan for Avalon Borough expressed concern about the rate at which individual lots were being sold and developed. This insight led to the establishment of zoning regulations which public officials follow to this day. Realizing the importance of the dune system, Avalon started to buy back beachfront property to allow dunes to naturally re-establish themselves. Avalon officials sought to help nature redevelop the dune system through sand fences, vegetation plantings, and by studying the tidal and windblown influences on the dunes. Protecting the maritime forest ecosystem was also a vital component of this process because the roots from the plants stabilizes the dune and keep it in place.

Today, The Avalon Environmental Commission (EC) oversees the protection of the dunes through many programs including: The Dune Vegetation Management Plan which is replacing invasive Japanese Black Pines with plants that are indigenous to the area, dune grass planting and sand replenishment on the beaches.

The original planners of Avalon recognized the importance of education for residents and visitors and stressed that “…protection of high quality environments assures the preservation of a high quality of living.” In that same spirit, the EC has developed this self-guided tour — The Avalon Dune and Beach Trail.

Avalon has developed a varied and unique dune ecosystem consisting of foredunes, secondary mid dunes, and high dunes, which is much more than just a pile of sand! To reinforce its efforts, the borough of Avalon has passed ordinances, educated residents and the public, and has set the trend for protecting the dunes. The Avalon Dune and Beach Trail gives you the opportunity to walk through one of these dune ecosystems, the maritime forest, and much more.

An old clipping of the Avalon dunes

An old clipping of the Avalon dunes

Historical Photo of a family posing on a sand dune.

Historical Photo of a family posing on a sand dune.

Exploring Avalon by horse 

Exploring Avalon by horse